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Today is Star Trek’s official 50th anniversary.  The concept is still one of the beSt and noblest ideals I have ever seen in science fiction.  A diverse group of educated men and women seeking out new life exploring the unknown.

I admit I am more of a next generation guy than the original but hey, let’s give the original its due.  Each show was unique combining classic science fiction settings with adventures involving Captain James T. Kirk and Mr. Spock.  Dr. McCoy would make one of the most famous trios in the history of television come to life when he joined the cast.

It’s a bit dated…especially on the technology bit of things.  I am writing this blog on what very well could be a tricorder.  That said, the ideas of the original show still resonate even now.  It still entertains.  Go find an episode and see for yourself.

But like I said earlier, I am a next generation guy.  I remember my dad watching the show when we were still living in Parkhill.  I didn’t find the show that interesting.   That said I was forced to watch it, so I did.

You know what?  I found myself being drawn in.  The next generation had an amazing cast.  Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes, Michael Dorn, Gates McFadden and the rest gelled well and there were many amazing episodes.

I still remember being terrified of the borg when they first appeared.   I enjoyed the show’s take on professor Moriarty from Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes.

And don’t even get me started on Q.

That said, next generation was an intelligent show.  Moral and ethical questions played a vital role in the show and I liked that there wasn’t always simple answers.  Real life doesn’t have easy answers; why should this series?  A great example of this was Data’s trial to determine if he was a lifeform.  Data was going to be stripped down for mass production.  He was going to resign and was put on trial if he had that right.   In this trial the question of what is life is examined.

Both the prosecution and defense was brilliant.  Forced to condemn his friend on threat of no trial at all, Will Riker puts on one of the most calculated and ruthless prosecution on the notion a machine could be alive.

Picard’s defense and data as a witness is brilliant and inspired.  Probably one of the best examinations of what is and could be alive.  And that is just one episode.

My favorite episode encapsulated what I love most abut Star Trek.  My favorite was “All Good Things…” the series finale.  I liked how that episode kept the audience in the dark about the story until the very end.  And once it was ovet Captain Picard and Q talked about exploration, which sticks with me even now.

“You seek to explore the possibilities of existence.”

The idea still gives me chills writing it.

It takes guts to brave the unknown.  The idea of leaving behind our home to find purpose still is a terrifying thought for most.  But really, what is it for?

Why seek out unless better to understand ourselves?  That more than anything is why I still love the idea of Star Trek.   I truly believe we are at our best when we seek out, explore and discover.  Boldly going out there is the best of all of us.  We are noble and fearless, childlike wonder and inquisitive; the very best of all our qualities come out.  Which is why while I enjoy Star Wars because it’s fun, it is Star Trek I want to be more like.

I want to be bold and seek the unknown.  I want to find the possibilities of my own existence.

Isn’t that a life worth living?

Happy 50 Star Trek.  We need more idea’s and ideals like you.